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Martlet

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    United Kingdom

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Martlet got a reaction from Bullionaire in Budgeting challenge - minimising expenses   
    Your local off licence?
  2. Like
    Martlet got a reaction from mezmer1411 in Fraud?   
    Very fake.  Type face is wrong and in the ebay pictures the hair is wrong with lines too deep (common on fakes).  Too shiny for a bullion Krug too, while definitely not proof finish.  Also nose hooks down, I think they do this one deliberately so able to say its a copy for local law, a lot of fakes have an obvious flaw.
     
  3. Like
    Martlet got a reaction from jonrms in goldsilver.be very dodgey   
    You just enter the IBAN number and Bank code (BIC) number.  Was this a while ago?  Transferwise blocked them for a while because their business name (Electrum) matches a cryptocurrency, which they dont want to support. 
  4. Like
    Martlet got a reaction from jonrms in goldsilver.be very dodgey   
    You just enter the IBAN number and Bank code (BIC) number.  Was this a while ago?  Transferwise blocked them for a while because their business name (Electrum) matches a cryptocurrency, which they dont want to support. 
  5. Like
    Martlet got a reaction from Phil100 in Safety Deposit Box   
    Admit i havent read the full legislation, the point about creditors I am certain on.  Anything in deposit boxes are unknown and the bail-in is supposed to be structured (banks pass test that their bail-in covers their exposure). The contents are your property, not assets or liabilities of the bank, which account deposits could be.  Numerous articles are based on others opinion, those articles are certainly speculating.  The risk would be emergency legislation changing the goals posts, though then seizures of boxes outside banks could be included too. 
  6. Like
    Martlet got a reaction from CosmikDebris in Safety Deposit Box   
    This is not correct, the bail-ins are focused on creditors, senior debt holder, not current accounts where the £85k guarantee still holds.  Deposits in a safe, you are not a creditor so shouldnt be covered under current bail-in regulation (future may change to law and regulation ). 
  7. Like
    Martlet got a reaction from CosmikDebris in Safety Deposit Box   
    This is not correct, the bail-ins are focused on creditors, senior debt holder, not current accounts where the £85k guarantee still holds.  Deposits in a safe, you are not a creditor so shouldnt be covered under current bail-in regulation (future may change to law and regulation ). 
  8. Haha
    Martlet got a reaction from Ansel in 2019 Gold Bullion Cheap   
    Reckon will be 40% solids if lucky. 
  9. Haha
    Martlet got a reaction from Ansel in 2019 Gold Bullion Cheap   
    Reckon will be 40% solids if lucky. 
  10. Haha
    Martlet got a reaction from Ansel in 2019 Gold Bullion Cheap   
    Reckon will be 40% solids if lucky. 
  11. Like
    Martlet got a reaction from KDave in Wealth Tax   
    There's far more to markets than selling at lowest price or high quality.  Convenience, tastes, reputation, so on have surprising large influence on buying behaviour.  A few round here know about this, collectors are not buying the lowest price or highest quality.  In some key areas there is no benefit from competition, or it is undesirable (law enforcement, water, roads for example). I dont advocate large state, far from it, I accept there a place for taxation in funding services (upto a point), see it as another form of investment. 
    In most countries when you dont pay taxes you face fines and imprisonment. Is it neither arbitrary or cruel, its enforcement of law we have chosen to support for decades.  It can be excessive, even punitive, but it isn't tyrannical.  Yes i'm being literal, its hyperbolic term and misuse devalues its use where governments are truly oppressive, such as those low tax Islamic states noted earlier. 
  12. Like
    Martlet got a reaction from KDave in Wealth Tax   
    There's far more to markets than selling at lowest price or high quality.  Convenience, tastes, reputation, so on have surprising large influence on buying behaviour.  A few round here know about this, collectors are not buying the lowest price or highest quality.  In some key areas there is no benefit from competition, or it is undesirable (law enforcement, water, roads for example). I dont advocate large state, far from it, I accept there a place for taxation in funding services (upto a point), see it as another form of investment. 
    In most countries when you dont pay taxes you face fines and imprisonment. Is it neither arbitrary or cruel, its enforcement of law we have chosen to support for decades.  It can be excessive, even punitive, but it isn't tyrannical.  Yes i'm being literal, its hyperbolic term and misuse devalues its use where governments are truly oppressive, such as those low tax Islamic states noted earlier. 
  13. Haha
    Martlet got a reaction from bored in Wealth Tax   
    Here's where the discord has crept in, from socialist merging economics and politics so much people assume they are the same. Markets are economic system, not political.  Its quite compatible to have the market providing services for the state that we decide through democracy we'd like to have as a society.  Pay taxes, government sets standards for service (you know, policy), seeks providers for the service, with some provision for core services not economical to provide in the market.  Does not have to be all or nothing.  
    Also, tyranny is defined as exercising power in a cruel or arbitrary way.  No one in the developed world lives under tyranny. 
  14. Like
    Martlet got a reaction from Bran in Why are so many analysts out of touch with the majority of american's financial situations?   
    Along lines of above, the typical journalist is middle class graduate on a decent salary, writing for middle class or upper-middle class people on decent salaries.  They write about what they know without proper research.  But then we tend to see a lot of the other end too, being told how poor everyone is and struggling, when most people only struggle financially because they buy into consumerism and live beyond their means. Globally absolute poverty is reducing, we're told to feel sorry for the factory worker in Malaysia on $5 a day or what ever, but they are greatly richer than a generation or two ago. 
  15. Like
    Martlet got a reaction from Oldun in Wealth Tax   
    Easier to do when you have massive resources to gain tax for revenue.  Unless a nation has low population and/or resource base, the idea of low tax doesnt work really, larger populations require, demand, public services.  
     
     
  16. Like
    Martlet got a reaction from mezmer1411 in Fraud?   
    Very fake.  Type face is wrong and in the ebay pictures the hair is wrong with lines too deep (common on fakes).  Too shiny for a bullion Krug too, while definitely not proof finish.  Also nose hooks down, I think they do this one deliberately so able to say its a copy for local law, a lot of fakes have an obvious flaw.
     
  17. Thanks
    Martlet got a reaction from KDave in Wealth Tax   
    Well the top 1% earners pay about 27% of income tax, top 50% earners pay 90% (UK), so i reckon the rich and better off pay a fairer share.  Certainly more than the advocates of redistribution will acknowledge and admit.  
    I dont mind tax per se, for law enforcement, education, healthcare, even some social support, and we pay plenty.  However wealth tax is too far, its simply born of envy, engineered to punish those who have accumulated wealth through effort or good fortune and already taxed at least once.  Its also destructive, to pay for the tax you'll likely need to divest some of the wealth, thus reducing its value.  But then thats part of the idea, to "share" the wealth even if there is less in total.  Imagine someone having to sell their business to pay the wealth tax, who is this going to help?  The only political activists who support wealth tax are socialist who want state ownership and control of everything. 
  18. Like
  19. Like
    Martlet reacted to SilverTanner in Photos: National Numismatic Musem, Mexico City   
    Thankyou for sharing this - I have some Spanish Colonial Mexican coins such as the Charles IV shown below - fortunately it matches your pic of the matrix!

  20. Like
    Martlet got a reaction from mezmer1411 in Fraud?   
    Very fake.  Type face is wrong and in the ebay pictures the hair is wrong with lines too deep (common on fakes).  Too shiny for a bullion Krug too, while definitely not proof finish.  Also nose hooks down, I think they do this one deliberately so able to say its a copy for local law, a lot of fakes have an obvious flaw.
     
  21. Like
    Martlet got a reaction from GrahamDiamond in Queens Beast   
    Its expected to be the Yale of Beaufort and due in March. 
  22. Like
    Martlet got a reaction from GrahamDiamond in Queens Beast   
    Its expected to be the Yale of Beaufort and due in March. 
  23. Like
    Martlet got a reaction from GrahamDiamond in Queens Beast   
    Its expected to be the Yale of Beaufort and due in March. 
  24. Like
    Martlet got a reaction from KDave in Anyone feelin inflation take a bite out of their ass?   
    You're saying its greedflation to take a basic commodity, apply some labour to sort for quality and add presentation ?  Might want to think on that   I'd call it adding value, and its up to people if they want pay for the service.  It also benefits you as the higher margin goods boost the retailer's gross margin, so they dont need to add so many pennies to the loose product.
     
    Yes, you've got it.  Individuals may not change purchases, if one in 10 might dont buy the product based on a higher price, thats lost revenue and reduced turnover.  And we shouldn't see this as hidden or underhanded, its in plain sight if interested to see.  As consumers we still obtain the goods we desire, and lets face this applies to luxuries.  Though agree some chocolate bars in some shops are ridiculous (bearly larger than fun size), we can chose to seek out a larger size elsewhere.
    This is market economics, it works well enough. Anyone want controlled economy with government directed prices?
     
  25. Thanks
    Martlet reacted to Zhorro in Sovereign Errors, Overdates and Varieties   
    With the advent of the 1887 Jubilee Head sovereign, the Royal Mint in London took the decision to use a more ‘yellow’ gold in order to make the intricate design stand out.  I have not seen this mentioned by Marsh but Hattons of London’s website describes the situation as follows:
              “With the introduction of a new [Jubilee] portrait the Royal Mint was uncertain how the gold coinage would look, especially as the new portrait had a much finer level of detail.
              To ensure a high standard of production they decided to soften the gold by adding 1.25% silver to the alloy which was usually 91.7% gold and the remainder copper (for
              strength). By replacing 1.25% of the copper with silver, the natural golden colour was enhanced and the coins of 1887 looked more ‘yellow’. 
              This was only ever carried out in one year – 1887. Tests with the usual alloy proved acceptable, so in the following year the silver was not added to the alloy, making the 1887
               coins a one-year-only alloy.”
    But did this apply to the Branches in Australia?  Below is a comparison of the London 1887 sovereign with the Melbourne one.  It seems that it was only the Royal Mint in London that used the ‘yellow’ gold in 1887?