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ChrisSIlver

Today I Received.....

ChrisSIlver

The error that was making some posts show as disappeared in this topic should now be fixed. 

Message added by ChrisSIlver

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20 minutes ago, Seasider said:

and all the old folk kept complaining that we was being robbed as a result.  Of course old pennies were worth something in those days.

 

42 minutes ago, Blockhead said:

Being born in the eighties I have learnt some of these but there were many I didn't know. You say Bob but that is slang for shilling just to confuse things. Why was there an amount called 'dollar' when it's pounds sterling? Why a 'tanner' which sounds far too similar to the much much greater amount of a 'tenner'? 

Don't forget 21 shillings was a Guinea... 

My dad said some of the more posh and expensive shops used to just display the price without saying if it was in pounds or guineas. Apparently if you had to ask you couldn't afford it. Don't know if there's any truth in that?

I believe a silver dollar or silver crown (5 bob/shillings) were a similar value in silver at some point. 

Just did a quick search and ...  The V.A. miuseum refers to the medallist John Sigismund Tanner (d. 1775) origin German; came to England in 1728, soon after was appointed as an engraver at the Royal Mint. Became Chief Engraver in 1741. Apparently the sixpence he designed for George II popularly gained his name". Never knew that.

People still referred to Guineas post decimalization particularly as you allude to for luxury clothing

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2 hours ago, Caratacus said:

The one thing you have to remember about these coins was to work in the duo-decimal system so even the lowest of the low shop assistant had to be pretty numerate.

If you had to add say 5 items at 7s4d & 3 farthing together  you really had to have your wits about you.

[If you didn't know there were 20 bobs to the pound;  or 10 florins; or 4 dollars; or 8 half crowns; or 40 tanners;  or 240 coppers (or  if your really old bun pennies!); 480 'appneys; or 960 farthings;    oooooh and 80 threepence.  And if you were at school at the time of the change over you had to learn the decimal translation which was'nt a direct translation -  so 12 coppers became 5 np  and 4d and 5d  2np.   Lucky they had fingers and slide rules....   ]  

The Churchill crown is a super bit of history (he would have sorted Brexit);  but I don't think there was any silver in general circulation coinage post 1947.

Sorry no idea about values.... but I can guess... still quite a nice little presentation to pass down multiple generations ........

 

 

Thanks for your knowledge. Very interesting how coins have changed. It’s funny I got more interested looking and researching these cheap old coins then I do with modern coins. 

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8 hours ago, Spanishsilver said:

Today I received this set. 

I don’t think it’s worth anything. 

Thank god im not old enough to remember them. 

Anyone got any information about them. Am I sitting on a super rare coin?

nah didn’t think so. 

1DDC0F3C-CDCE-4096-A6AB-7D8AFD3F2BA2.jpeg

4CEF9DA2-3817-4FB6-806C-B734036CEDAE.jpeg

Nice! The shillings need switching around though (single lion is the Scottish version). :)

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2 hours ago, Caratacus said:

The one thing you have to remember about these coins was to work in the duo-decimal system so even the lowest of the low shop assistant had to be pretty numerate.

If you had to add say 5 items at 7s4d & 3 farthing together  you really had to have your wits about you.

[If you didn't know there were 20 bobs to the pound;  or 10 florins; or 4 dollars; or 8 half crowns; or 40 tanners;  or 240 coppers (or  if your really old bun pennies!); 480 'appneys; or 960 farthings;    oooooh and 80 threepence.  And if you were at school at the time of the change over you had to learn the decimal translation which was'nt a direct translation -  so 12 coppers became 5 np  and 4d and 5d  2np.   Lucky they had fingers and slide rules....   ]  

The Churchill crown is a super bit of history (he would have sorted Brexit);  but I don't think there was any silver in general circulation coinage post 1947.

Sorry no idea about values.... but I can guess... still quite a nice little presentation to pass down multiple generations ........

 

 

And to think my Nan used to complain that the new decimal system was confusing!

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50 minutes ago, Seasider said:

and all the old folk kept complaining that we was being robbed as a result.  Of course old pennies were worth something in those days.

5 minutes ago, argentmajor said:

And to think my Nan used to complain that the new decimal system was confusing!

As Seasider said, everyone thought they were being robbed as the shops "rounded up" which resulted in inflation  and it really did confuse people.... LSD (Libra, solidus, denarius) had basically been around since the Romans....    Lets hope we never "Eurolies"  our currency...........

 

 

 

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14 hours ago, Caratacus said:

I believe a silver dollar or silver crown (5 bob/shillings) were a similar value in silver at some point. 

One of my favourite coins (that I don't own) is the 1804 5 shilling Bank of England token.  It has a legend on one side saying Five Shillings  :  Dollar.  Picture borrowed from Chards.

 

Reverse of 1820 George III Crown

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1 hour ago, Seasider said:

One of my favourite coins (that I don't own) is the 1804 5 shilling Bank of England token.  It has a legend on one side saying Five Shillings  :  Dollar.  Picture borrowed from Chards.

 

Reverse of 1820 George III Crown

What a classy looking "coin" - (I guess it has a legal value);  although Britannia has certainly improved her looks recently - she looks a bit worn out here which I can only put down to the French who were up to their usual tricks at the time.

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8 minutes ago, Caratacus said:

What a classy looking "coin" - (I guess it has a legal value);  although Britannia has certainly improved her looks recently - she looks a bit worn out here which I can only put down to the French who were up to their usual tricks at the time.

It probably would have had value specifically with the Bank of England but probably wouldn't have been legal tender (I suspect, not a specialist). Damn interesting piece though :)

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21 hours ago, MickB said:

Today my silver Brexit themed medal from @SilverStan arrived. Great piece of work.

image.jpg

I think we all feel just the same today as HM after Parliaments shinnanigans.......

Maybe HM should sack the lot and just take up the reigns as she would do a better job..........

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