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vand

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  1. Like
    vand got a reaction from mr-dead in Gold Monitoring Thread £ GBP only   
    Gold GBP has now outperformed FTSE 100 with dividends reinvested over 1, 3 & 5 years.
    https://stockcharts.com/h-sc/ui?s=%24GOLD%3A%24GBPUSD&p=D&yr=5&mn=0&dy=0&id=p11467062996
    http://stockcharts.com/h-sc/ui?s=%24GOLD%3A%24GBPUSD&p=D&yr=3&mn=0&dy=0&id=p11467062996
    https://stockcharts.com/h-sc/ui?s=%24GOLD%3A%24GBPUSD&p=D&yr=1&mn=0&dy=0&id=p60933500355
  2. Like
    vand got a reaction from AuricGoldfinger in High Yield Portfolio picks   
    **Alert**
    This thread is for active investors.
    Furthermore, this thread is for active paper investments.
    **//End Alert**
     
    Let's talk high dividend shares. Solid bluechip companies that you can stick in a portfolio and which will pay you to hold.
    http://www.morningstar.co.uk/uk/news/132966/top-20-ftse-100-dividend-paying-stocks.aspx/
  3. Like
    vand got a reaction from goldmember44 in Gold Confiscation UK ?   
    PM confiscation is just not something worth worrying about.. it is literally the most difficult way for a govt to try extracting wealth from its people. It's one of the advantages of owning physical, after all.
    The govt has both easier and much more lucrative methods of wealth confiscation should they decide to do so.
  4. Like
    vand got a reaction from goldmember44 in Gold Confiscation UK ?   
    Confiscation is not something that could ever be policed or enforced, that's why I think the possibility of it is minuscule. How would they ever prove otherwise if you claim you just "lost it?"
    The worst laws are those that are unenforceable, for all they do is make a mockery of otherwise law-abiding citizens and increase our resentment towards the State.
     
  5. Like
    vand reacted to sixgun in Gold Confiscation UK ?   
    This is quite a shock to most of the UK stackers here - that following WWII there were controls on gold for decades. The controls in the 1960's were mocked in Parliament b/c there were virtually no cases of the restrictions being applied but it shows the UK criminal cabal have been willing to bring in their unlawful rules. i wonder if this forum is watched and who says what and puts what on the forum is being recorded. It doesn't affect me as i lost my job recently and had to sell off all my coins. It broke my heart but needs must when the Devil drives.
  6. Like
    vand reacted to HelpingHands in Gold Confiscation UK ?   
    Kind of.  There was the 1966 Exchange Control Act during which individuals could only hold four gold coins.
    There are some posts on here let me find them.............
  7. Like
    vand reacted to Pipers in The Permanent Portfolio   
    Thanks for the info @vand this thread is really interesting band enjoyable.
  8. Like
    vand got a reaction from AuricGoldfinger in The Permanent Portfolio   
    From 1972-2011 the PP almost matched an equity-only portfolio with much less volatility
    https://www.thepermanentportfolio.com/permanent-portfolio-performance-and-historical-returns-us/

     
    However, it should also be noted that the PP has not done very well comparatively in the last few years, as the equities bull market has gone on.
    That suggests to me that now is a good time to start building a PP, as we will see reversion to the mean in the coming years.
  9. Like
    vand got a reaction from Derv in What does your wealth pyramid look like?   
    Pyramid scheme.
    Haha.
    It's not bad, but imo it's not complete.
    The bedrock of all wealth building must start with controlling how much you spend in relation to how much you earn, ie your savings rate.  This necessitates aligning your spending with your life values. Unfortunately most people never figure this one out yet, so they never have a chance of building any wealth.
    Some people try to cheat or shortcut this with leverage, which usually blows up sooner or later.
    Then you can start talking about where to put your money. I like his liking for real assets. Probably needs to consider bonds too. They are the biggest investible asset class, after all. Diversification is good. Managing risk is at least as important as chasing a return. And finally minimizing the taxes you pay is super important. 
    There are plenty of millionaires in our society. You probably wouldn't recognise them any differently if you passed them in the street. Most of them drive Kias rather than Lamborghinis, built several streams of income and amassed their wealth slowly over time.
  10. Like
    vand got a reaction from Roy in What does your wealth pyramid look like?   
    Pyramid scheme.
    Haha.
    It's not bad, but imo it's not complete.
    The bedrock of all wealth building must start with controlling how much you spend in relation to how much you earn, ie your savings rate.  This necessitates aligning your spending with your life values. Unfortunately most people never figure this one out yet, so they never have a chance of building any wealth.
    Some people try to cheat or shortcut this with leverage, which usually blows up sooner or later.
    Then you can start talking about where to put your money. I like his liking for real assets. Probably needs to consider bonds too. They are the biggest investible asset class, after all. Diversification is good. Managing risk is at least as important as chasing a return. And finally minimizing the taxes you pay is super important. 
    There are plenty of millionaires in our society. You probably wouldn't recognise them any differently if you passed them in the street. Most of them drive Kias rather than Lamborghinis, built several streams of income and amassed their wealth slowly over time.
  11. Like
    vand reacted to MancunianStacker in Investing in Irish Whiskey   
    This might be useful to someone:
    https://www.artsandcollections.com/article/a-whisky-investment-guide-for-beginners/
    Last post on the subject I promise but £50 to £1,200 in 19 years for a single bottle of 18 year old Macallan sounds like a great side hobby! Might start drinking and collecting 🥃 
     
  12. Haha
    vand got a reaction from Goldmick in Gold high spot price   
    Now you're just being mean.... 
    Anyway, I'm sure he's tripled his money in BTC since then 

     
  13. Like
    vand got a reaction from Pipers in Bear Signs   
    @Pipers There could be some truth in there being a short squeeze, but tbh I wouldn't worry about it. There are always shorters in the market, just as there are those trading the long side. 
     
    Another factor to consider is that it seems by all intents and purposes the Fed's tightening is done, and the next move will be down. Historically markets have peaked on these changes in direction.
  14. Haha
    vand got a reaction from goldmember44 in Gold high spot price   
    Now you're just being mean.... 
    Anyway, I'm sure he's tripled his money in BTC since then 

     
  15. Like
    vand got a reaction from Groundz in Cheltenham Festival   
    Here is an example:
     
    Cloudy Dream, 2.10 Cheltenham
    Best price is currently 25/1 (ie 26.0 in decimal) at Bet365 who are offering 1/4 odds on the top 3 places (this is a big bonus - industry standard is only 1/5th odds)
    Back £100 Each Way @ 25/1
    You are getting 25/1 (26.0) on the win and 25/4 on the place (7.25)
    On the exchange To Win market you can lay Cloudy Dream at 32.0, so lay £81.37 against Cloudy Dream for a straight match
    On the exchange Top-3 market you can lay Cloudy Dream at at just 3.3 - THIS is the key price that makes this all possible. So lay £223.01 at 3.3. 
     
    If Cloudy Dream wins the 4 parts of your bets will be broken down as:
    25  * 100 = £2500 on Bookie win part
    6.25 * 100 = £625 on Bookie the place part 
    -81.37 * (32-1) = -£2522 on the Exchange To Win 
    -223.01 * (3.3-1) = -£513.13 on the Exchange Top-3 market
    2500 + 625 - 2522 - 513.13 = £89.87 profit
     
     
    If Cloudy Dream finishes 2nd or 3rd the 4 parts of your bets will be broken down as:
    -£100 on the on Bookie win part (lose stake)
    6.25 * 100 = £625 on Bookie the place part 
    £81.37 / 1.05 = £77.49 won on the Exchange To Win market (divide by 1.05 for Betfair 5% win commission)
    -223.01 * (3.3-1) = -£513.13 on the Exchange Top-3 market
    -100 + 625 + 77.49 - 513.13 = £89.36 profit
     
    If Cloudy Dream finishes outside the top 3:
    -£100 on the on Bookie win part (lose stake)
    -£100 on the on Bookie place part (lose stake)
    £81.37 / 1.05 = £77.49 won on the Exchange To Win market (divide by 1.05 for Betfair 5% win commission)
    £223.01 / 1.05 = £212.39  won on the Exchange Top-3 market (divide by 1.05 for Betfair 5% win commission)
    -100 -100 + 77.49 + 212.39 = £89.99 profit
     
    Of course, you need to be able to put up the £3000 or so liability in Betfair to do this bet.
    So win, place or otherwise, you can guarantee yourself £89 by placing this bet and hedging off the appropriate amount
     
     
     
     
  16. Haha
    vand got a reaction from Roy in Gold high spot price   
    Now you're just being mean.... 
    Anyway, I'm sure he's tripled his money in BTC since then 

     
  17. Like
    vand reacted to Stuntman in Advice on £4k Diversification   
    To the OP - it sounds as if you have built some excellent foundations already and have got your head screwed on very well.
     
    I'd echo the advice already given to put money into your pension, especially if you can contribute to a workplace pension and even more especially if/when you are a higher rate taxpayer.  This will build you an even more solid foundation for retirement.  At 27, you can afford to take a pretty high degree of risk with these investments for the next 25-ish years, so be aggressive with your choices here (i.e. buy things that other people currently want to sell, or which appear to be priced at an undervalue - see the Woodford example above).  I'd be investing in the UK, Europe and Asia now with any new money.
     
    Otherwise, the best general advice is always try to live within your means, and maintain the discipline of putting away some of your spare money each year.  I have been doing this for about 25 years now and have about 9 times my annual salary invested at the moment across my ISA, SIPP, cash savings and physical PMs as a result of these actions, plus 13 years worth of contributions to a frozen final salary pension and 30 years of UK State Pension contributions (I am 50 years old).
     
    Try not to worry about short or medium term market swings.  Invest regularly if you can, but gain enough knowledge so that you can buy a bit more than usual on any market dips.  To that end, try to maintain a cash savings balance of up to 1 year's worth of living expenses if you can.  I currently have about 2 years' worth in cash, but my income has historically been a bit less stable than many people's.
     
    Good luck 😋
     
     
     
  18. Haha
    vand got a reaction from Pottedbeef in Advice on £4k Diversification   
    I just started buying the Woodford Income Fund and TBH I think it's great that he's getting hung out to dry. Woodford's star has fallen and his name is toxic now... HL have struck him off their Wealth50... these are "so bad it's good" levels of sentiment around his fund right now. I will consistently accumulate more over the next couple of years and leave him to get on with the job with rebuilding the fund and his reputation.
    I won't pretend that everything is rosy with Woodford Income at the moment, but then again if they were then we wouldn't have this chance to buy in so cheaply. 
    In 3 years time he'll have clawed his way back and people will see the 5 year performance in line with most others, but that will hide the massive dip and recovery and the story of those who were dumb enough/brave enough to sell/buy on the panic.
  19. Like
    vand got a reaction from caloundracats in Advice on £4k Diversification   
    Thanks @Roy for the vote of confidence!
     
    Firstly, regardless of L-ISA/ISA, & PMs, if you are eligible for an employer pension contribution match then you must do whatever you need to get the most they are willing to contribute. This is by far the easiest investment decision that most people have to make.. and even then many are getting it wrong!
    Beyond that, there is no real right or wrong because it comes down to personal preference, much more than maths and economic clairvoyance.  Saving for a house deposit and buying stocks/PMs are not and indeed should not be mutually exclusive, and if you are unsure exactly what you want to do then my advice is to do all of them at the same time. You'll figure out which way you want to tilt as you gain more experience and knowledge.
    I would also strongly advise to tune out all the chatter about the economy and Trump and Brexit, because it is nothing you can control anyway. Focus on optimizing what you have direct control of; your budgeting, your spending, and your long term career learning and development and you will be fine.
  20. Like
    vand reacted to MickB in Investing in Irish Whiskey   
    I was recently told that Irish whiskey won't be able to keep up with demand in the next few years and it could be an opportunity to invest into it. I've had a look at a couple of sites on the internet and one has a minimum requirement of £5000 to be put down & offering average returns of 10-15% p/a.. Would this be a safe way to invest or is it a new way for scammers to fleece people? I don't know of anyone who has any knowledge of this type of investment.
    The site below looks legit, however there maybe more than a couple of other websites out there that are probably too good to be true.
    https://whiskeywealthclub.com/
  21. Like
    vand got a reaction from Roy in Advice on £4k Diversification   
    Thanks @Roy for the vote of confidence!
     
    Firstly, regardless of L-ISA/ISA, & PMs, if you are eligible for an employer pension contribution match then you must do whatever you need to get the most they are willing to contribute. This is by far the easiest investment decision that most people have to make.. and even then many are getting it wrong!
    Beyond that, there is no real right or wrong because it comes down to personal preference, much more than maths and economic clairvoyance.  Saving for a house deposit and buying stocks/PMs are not and indeed should not be mutually exclusive, and if you are unsure exactly what you want to do then my advice is to do all of them at the same time. You'll figure out which way you want to tilt as you gain more experience and knowledge.
    I would also strongly advise to tune out all the chatter about the economy and Trump and Brexit, because it is nothing you can control anyway. Focus on optimizing what you have direct control of; your budgeting, your spending, and your long term career learning and development and you will be fine.
  22. Super Like
    vand got a reaction from Oldun in Advice on £4k Diversification   
    Thanks @Roy for the vote of confidence!
     
    Firstly, regardless of L-ISA/ISA, & PMs, if you are eligible for an employer pension contribution match then you must do whatever you need to get the most they are willing to contribute. This is by far the easiest investment decision that most people have to make.. and even then many are getting it wrong!
    Beyond that, there is no real right or wrong because it comes down to personal preference, much more than maths and economic clairvoyance.  Saving for a house deposit and buying stocks/PMs are not and indeed should not be mutually exclusive, and if you are unsure exactly what you want to do then my advice is to do all of them at the same time. You'll figure out which way you want to tilt as you gain more experience and knowledge.
    I would also strongly advise to tune out all the chatter about the economy and Trump and Brexit, because it is nothing you can control anyway. Focus on optimizing what you have direct control of; your budgeting, your spending, and your long term career learning and development and you will be fine.
  23. Like
    vand reacted to Paul in Advice on £4k Diversification   
    As most will agree here, im a black sheep a lone wolf.  I dont follow the herd. Think for yourself.  School and uni's learn you to be one of the heard another tax payer another useless eater 
    Firstly it is very, very rare you will become rich working for someone else unless you make it up the greasy pole to the top CEO etc
    Instead, create yourself a mathematical equation that "scales", then work that equation to death while acting, assessing, and adjusting along the way.
    Few people understand that all of our actions and career decisions implicitly tie us into an equation.
    This equation can be relatively simple or extremely complex.
    At the end of the day, it will be your self-directed EQUATION that determines how much wealth you can (or cannot) accumulate.
    Equations that scale make their owners rich.
    Equations that do not, make their owners slaves to the system of “trading time for money.” ie working for a set wage each week/month
    The beauty of this equation is that you can control its basic variable parameters.
    But most people DO NOT because most people don’t even realise this equation exists as you are not taught it in school 
    If you decide to get a job at McDonalds/Tesco and are paid £10/hour — congratulations, you just created yourself an equation to which you are now bound to:
    Monetary Wealth = (rate of pay) x (hours worked)
    If you work 37.5 hours, your equation is £10 X 37.5 hrs, which equals £375
    If you go to uni and accumulate £50K in debt so you can have the privilege of earning £40K/year, congratulations, that’s your new equation.
    Monetary Wealth = (hourly salary) X (years worked)
    To complicate the mix, you are then suggested to save your money and give it to Wall Street/Stock Market.
    There you get another equation:
    Monetary Wealth = Market investments X annual ROI
    This mainstream advice is the standard prescription for mediocrity.
    And it’s clearly not a method to create monetary success in the short terms but the long term
    As you can see, the problem with “trading your time for money” or “Wall-Street” as a conduit to wealth is that the variables are extremely limited and uncontrollable.
    You simply cannot work x3,000 hours at McDonalds in one week.
    You cannot force McDonalds to pay you £1,000+ per hour.
    You cannot ask Wall Street to give you a +4000% return.
    There are only so many hours in a day, and years in a life.
    And herein lies the lie behind uni: Young people are told to go to uni so they can increase their PER HOUR rate from £10 to, say, £25 or even£30 may be considered a good hourly wage.
    Or if they go into more technical fields (STEM stuff) they get away from hourly to annual pay. Now instead of making £50/hour, they make £50,000/year.
    The problem STILL remains.
    TIME CANNOT BE SCALED.
    You cannot work x1000 hours in day.
    You cannot live to be x500 years old.
    You cannot ask Wall Street to give you a +4000% return in one year.
    You cannot ask your employer to give you a raise from £50K/year, to £500K.
    Your hands are tied because the equation you’ve given yourself SUCKS.
    Instead of trying to scale time (more debt to earn a better education to earn a better paying job under an annual salary regime) start scaling units— units separate from your time.
    This means you become a creator of relative "value".
    Value ££ is the result of people pleasing or problem solving.
    Creators produce products, services, books, information, inventions, it doesn’t matter so as long as:
    A) Your creation can eventually become separate from your time.
    You can scale your creation to a level that can change your life.
    The other metric is relative value.
    Sure your blog full of fitness tips my be valuable— but it isn’t relatively valuable because the web is filled with ‘em.
    Whatever you create, it must be relatively valuable in the global pool of options.
    This doesn’t mean you have to be the next Steve Jobs — it just means to skew value on one or two attributes; faster shipping, improved operation, better logistics, better service, better UI, better this, better that.
    Entrepreneurship is about improving, more so than inventing the next hot thing.
    So let’s assume you invent a cool new widget that appeals to women who are mothers.
    Your equation now becomes:
    Wealth = Widget Profit X Widgets Sold.
    This is where things change.
    Now you can SCALE a part of your equation. There are billions of mothers on the planet. Additionally, you control your widget operations and can fiddle with pricing, sourcing, and other operations integral to your widget.
    So if you sell 100,000 widgets at £5 profit each, you just earned £500,000.
    If a IG influencer raves about your product in IG and you get a rush of traffic for 1 week, selling +4,000 units, you make £20K+ in week.
    Your ceiling for wealth can be influenced by your execution, marketing, and decision-making. You cannot do this under a “time trade” regime.
    This is how you create wealth beyond the BS preached in the mainstream (get a job, save your money, invest with Wall Street for 50 years blah blah)
    Of course I’m not suggesting this is easy.
    The key is to change the equation, change the probability, and change your potential outcomes. Nothing is easy, but neither is getting up at 6AM, fighting traffic for 50 years, and retiring with a gold watch on 50% of your income.
    And when you move to a “unit” metric, your markets expand beyond your local city — so what not appeal locally, might appeal globally. 
    Here’s my SIMPLIFIED equation for wealth currently. (Actually it’s much larger but I think you get the picture.) The sum is its many parts and always in development.
    (bup)(bs1)(bc1) + (bup)(bs1)(bc2) + (bup)(bs1)(bc3) + (bup)(bs1)(bc1) +(bup)(bs1)(bc4) + (bup)(bs1)(bc5) + (bup)(bs1)(bc6) + (bup)(bs1)(bc7) +(bup)(bs1)(bc8) + (bup)(bs1)(bc9) + (bup)(bs1)(bc10) + (bup)(bs1)(bc11) +(roy1)(bs1) + (roy2)(bs1) + (roy3)(bs1) + (roy5)(bs1) + (roy6)(bs1) + (roy7)(bs1) + (roy8)(bs1) + (roy9)(bs1) + (roy10)(bs1) + (roy11)(bs1) + (roy12)(bs1) + (roy2)(bs2) + (roy2)(bs2) + (roy2)(bs2) + (bup)(bs2)(bc1) + (bup)(bs2)(bc3) + (bup)(bs4)(bc2) + (bup)(bs5)(bc2) + (bup)(bs2)(bc6) + (bup)(bs2)(bc2) + (bup)(bs2)(bc2) + (bup)(bs2)(bc10) + (bup)(bs2)(bc2) + (wt)(webconv)(ad1) + (wt)(webconv)(ad2) + (wt)(webconv)(ad3) + (webtraffic)(insconv)(insfee) + (inv1)(roi1) + (inv2)(roi2) + (inv3)(roi3)+(inv4)(roi4) +(inv4)(roi5) + (inv5)(roi4) + (inv5)(roi5) + (inv5)(roi5) + (inv6)(roi6) + (res)(avg-app) + val(biz1)(pe) + val(biz2)(pe) + val(biz3)(pe) + altcoins(value) + altcoins(value) + altcoins(value) + altcoins(value) + btc(value) + eth(value) + …
    Most of those variables listed above I can CONTROL and SCALE.
    1) Create relative value.
    2) Don't chase Money ££,  money/cash is a direct result of being a "People pleaser", a solver peoples pain points and problems.  Money is everywhere and people will gladly throw money in your direction for pleasing them and solving their pain points whoever big or small.
    3) Recognize your equation.
    4) Work the equation.
    5) Act — Assess — Adjust
    6) Repeat +
    That my friend is how you create monetary wealth QUICKLY
     
  24. Thanks
    vand reacted to sixgun in Gold high spot price   
    Remember this guy - sold 8oz of nice gold coins off after listening to the fake news media and thinking Brexit would send the price of gold down.
     
  25. Like
    vand got a reaction from Derv in £GBP heading to oblivion   
    I was mulling over the question: is Britain in long term decline? Looking at the long term performance of GBP I would have to conclude YES.
    https://www.poundsterlinglive.com/bank-of-england-spot/historical-effective-exchange-rates/GBP-history
    Sterling has never been this weak, and imo it's not just a temporary Brexit phenomenon. The decades we have spent enticing people to pile into bricks and mortar instead of into business and enterprises that actually produce something of value have had a pronounced long term effect that has made us all worse off. We are now living the long term effects of 3 previous housing booms.