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vand

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  1. Like
    vand got a reaction from JCRJM in Payday   
    Payday is a bit of a foreign concept to me nowadays as I work a 2nd job about 25-30hrs/week, but it has been paying better than my day job lately and its all daily cash in hand (no I'm not a gigolo or take my clothes off in any way shape or form). The important stuff gets taken care like clockwork; always has, always will. 
  2. Like
    vand reacted to onlyroadtoheaven in Payday   
    Absolutely. I put my order through on Goldsilver.be as soon as the money hits my account. Whatever is left is my living expenses for the month. Pay yourself first as the Richest Man in Babylon said.
  3. Like
    vand reacted to DrKarlMoneys in What are your typical silver purchase volumes or sizes?   
    With silver prices so low and potentially quite large bubbles on the horizon I'm taking the opportunity to buy silver to stack more than collectable pieces with higher premiums.
    However the stock market crashing and silver shooting up again is speculative. Silver has been shown to beat inflation, but over long time frames. What is more certain is that throwing some money at my mortgage while interest rates are nice and low will save me money, especially in the long term. I therefore prioritise this and spent approx. £330 on this group order. As tempting as the pretty shiny things are it's important to not over exert yourself.
  4. Like
    vand reacted to Mark10110 in End game / why stack / why collect   
    Why do people stack.  
    My story is a bit sad but I am happy to share.
     
    It comes from my lowest moment in life, I was trying to learn a trade so I volunteered 4 days a week with the local council as a Plumbing Volunteer on a government "switch program" where you work for free and the business pays your college for your qualifications. I worked the remaining 3 days at Asda stacking shelves living alone in a 1 bedroom flat struggling to keep my head above water financially. I remember it being Wednesday 2 days before my Asda payday and I was on the bus home and I noticed I had £5 in my back pocket and became overcome with glee as I realised I could treat myself!
    I got myself Fish Chips peas and Gravy walked home looking forwards to a rare treat. I got into my flat hit the light switch and it didn't come on. This is when I suddenly realised that £5 was for electric. I remember eating it in the window using the streetlight to see what I was eating as I cried as a 27 year old man. I never felt so low and disappointed in my life and wondered if it was even worth all this effort I was putting in. It was in that moment I decided I would do something when I got my career to secure my future financially. 
    Today I am a Gas engineer for Britain's biggest Gas industry. I will carry that moment with me forever.
  5. Like
    vand got a reaction from Attilio in Does Goldsilver.be or Europeanmint have any coupons to lower their shipping?   
    I don't know if anyone has mentioned it, but you can store and COMBINE ORDERS with GS.be
    I do this all the time, and only take delivery once or twice a year. It saves me at least £200 a year, which adds up to a lot of extra metal.
  6. Like
    vand got a reaction from 5huggy in PM's in freefall??   
    I'm buying more heavily. But that was always my plan anyway. 
    I have already maxed out the overpayment on my mortage this year, so I have the spare cash for the next 3 months.
    50oz added yesterday, 112oz so far this month.
    Still have money on the sidelines. I do advocate the steady buying cost-avg strategy, but my strategy also includes the flexibility to make a few discretionary buys each year when I think the market is very oversold. 
    Most of my money was destined to finally complete on my mortgage in the next 12 months, but if prices stay THIS low, I will seriously have to  think about reprioritising and increasing my PMs allocation.
  7. Like
    vand reacted to BackyardBullion in PM's in freefall??   
    I would just like to add my 2 cents here 
    PM price drops are common and they often correct themselves (maybe not all the way) to a certain degree. Just because prices are falling today does not mean anyone should rush out and buy. I have and always will advocate sticking to buying strategies and to always buy within your means. 
    Also, don't put all your eggs into one basket - whilst prices are low that does not mean that they should be the sole focus of a saving strategy.
    Personally, I am going to be spending the same amount of money I had planned to this weekend - all it means is I will get a few more oz's for my money!
  8. Like
    vand got a reaction from MancunianStacker in Michael Maloney   
    Shrinkflation!
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-42864685
    At least Jaffa cakes have bucked the trend
  9. Like
    vand got a reaction from Roy in End game / why stack / why collect   
    I think you should have 3-6 months of cash before and as well as a stack of precious metals. Having to convert your stack to cover living expenses is a guaranteed loss maker.
  10. Like
    vand got a reaction from MancunianStacker in Michael Maloney   
    Shrinkflation!
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-42864685
    At least Jaffa cakes have bucked the trend
  11. Like
    vand got a reaction from Roy in End game / why stack / why collect   
    I think you should have 3-6 months of cash before and as well as a stack of precious metals. Having to convert your stack to cover living expenses is a guaranteed loss maker.
  12. Like
    vand got a reaction from SILVERFINGER in The Farce of UK Silver Stackers Facebook Group   
    Not being funny, but anyone joining a FB group advertising they hold physical precious metals is an idiot.
  13. Like
    vand got a reaction from PansPurse in The Attraction to Silver Unboxing videos   
    TBH I find most of them quite dull, unless they actually use the unboxing as a entrypoint for a further more meaningful discussion.
    If they're just about commentary on opening your latest package and showing what you've bought then it's quite tedious.
  14. Like
    vand got a reaction from PansPurse in The Attraction to Silver Unboxing videos   
    TBH I find most of them quite dull, unless they actually use the unboxing as a entrypoint for a further more meaningful discussion.
    If they're just about commentary on opening your latest package and showing what you've bought then it's quite tedious.
  15. Like
    vand got a reaction from Bullionaire in Revisiting - How Much PMs should you hold?   
    "How much PMs should one hold?" is one of those "how long is a piece of string?" questions. The answer will be very different for everyone depending on factors such as your age, income, debt, free cashflow, your net assets, your expectation, and understanding of PMs. Holding no PMs at all leave you open to many political and economic risks that have been well discussed, yet putting 100% of your wealth into PMs is also not smart, as the fortunes of PMs can wax and wane wildly also.
    There are different ways you to measure your PM holdings, and this is important. Firstly and most easily you can consider the outright number of Oz of gold/silver that you have accumulated. An oz of gold is an oz of gold, after all. However, I believe that a better and more rounded way of looking at this is to also consider how much this represents of your net assets. 
    For a young person just out of college who maybe has some debt and no working history to have accumulated any savings, pension or property, they have zero or even negative net asset. Does it make sense to  start accumulating 30oz of silver a month for this person, as much as it does to someone who has been working for 20 years, has a decent pension pot and home equity, and wishes to diversify with PMs? I would argue their priorities are different. The true price of any investment is the opportunity cost of buying and holding it. Ploughing a sizeable chunk of your salary into PMs takes away a lot of resources that might be needed for more pressing matters. PMs can and should be bought by far more people than they currently are, but it has to be proportional to each person's circumstance. Aggressively accumulating 1000oz of silver may be far too much for our newly graduated debt-laden student, but it may be far too little for our hypothetical middle-aged higher-income manager who has steadily built up his net assets throughout his working life.
    Personally, as someone who has always been a saver/investor with 20 years of working history behind me, and probably at least 20 more still ahead of me, I ran the sums for my own situation and it altered the way I think of my stack. Having accumulated well over triple-digit oz of silver, I was beginning to ask myself if I was putting too much into an "unproductive asset." However, when I recalculated it all as simply a part of my overall net asset (housing equity + cash + shares + pension + car) it only came to about 7%. For me, it makes more sense to think of my PM holdings in this way than simply to think about how many ozs are in my stack, and I've decided that I'm very comfortable holding up to 20% of my wealth in PMs. 
    As an aside, repaying high interest debt is by far the most useful thing that anyone can do with their monthly paycheque. Anyone who has credit card debt should not even think about investing in PMs or anything else until they fully pay off this crippling burden. You will never find a better risk/reward profile on any investment venture that matches the interest savings that you can make from just paying off high interest debt - it doesn't exist. 
    For most people then, credit card & possibly personal loan debt should be prioritized before buying PMs.
     
  16. Like
    vand reacted to Ajohn151 in New Member not New stacker   
    Hi All. Thanks for the add. I have been stacking since 1999 when I bought my first 1 Oz AGE for $335’ish. Oh those were the days! I had no idea what I was doing but I had a sense that saving in something tangible was smart. Not long after that the dot com bubble burst and I saw people I personally knew lose everything. They had mortgaged their houses to invest in stocks 😳. 
    I am now way more into silver than gold. I have a little gold but mostly the shiny white metal. I buy every other Friday regardless of price dollar cost averaging. I prefer government issued rounds to generic but have some generic also. 
    I also stack lead and brass as shooting is my other hobby. Prefer long distance precision shooting.
    I work in healthcare IT for a large global health IT company headquartered nearby. That’s really about it. Thanks for the add. I found this form via   YouTube and Backyard Bullion. I hope to learn more and contribute where I can.
    Thanks,
    Ajohn151
     
     
  17. Like
    vand got a reaction from ChrisSIlver in Paying off the mortgage, one brick at a time   
    We're not there just yet, but my long term strategy which I insisted on when we bought our flat 5 years ago is now closer to the end that it is to the beginning.
    When we bought our flat in 2011 we paid exactly £250k for it and we had already saved up 20% deposit. We got what I considered a fairly priced place at that time, but remember than lending was very tight during that year and we certainly had to jump through a few hoops in order to make it all happen. We could also have stretched ourselves and got a bigger place, but frankly I didn't want to. Our plan was always to buy modestly and overpay the mortgage on it as much as we could so we could own it outright within 10 years.
    Now, 5 years on, we are well over half way there.. our monthly overpayments bought the loan down a little each month, but we did not readjust our payments, we kept putting a fixed amount in each month, so as well as the principle coming down, the interest would come down even more every month.  5 years ago we were paying £600/month in interest, today we are paying around just £250/month.
    We've been fortunate enough to have stable employment during this time and a few pay rises along the way - nothing spectacular, but year on year it all adds up and life becomes a little easier. In the last year I've found another useful income stream, so we the day that we make the final payment will hopefully be even sooner than we initially planned. 
    I just share this because I feel it just shows you the value of putting in a long term plan and sticking to it. Without taking action when we did we'd no doubt be lining some landlord's pockets with £16k/year. Not that there's anything wrong with renting - but if you're renting because you don't have a long term plan then you are indeed just perpetually throwing good money away and wasting the part of your life that you spent earning it. I've certainly squandered a lot of money and opportunity in my youth (who hasn't?) but as you get a bit older and wiser you learn patience take a longer term view on things. We've lived well within our means and sacrificed plenty of little luxuries along the way, but also we have found interests that have been life enhancing which are (almost) free. 
    All this, and I still plan on stacking PMs over the next few years, in fact I would say that the mortgage plan coming to maturity has indeed given us the financial freedom to invest in PMs, as well as a degree of financial security in other ways too.
  18. Like
    vand got a reaction from Goldhooked in Paying off the mortgage, one brick at a time   
    Yes, the strategy has worked well, but only because:
    - We took decisive action when the market was still in the doldrums in 2011 and we thought the risk/reward of buying was very favourable. However it would have been easy to have carry on the "one more year of renting" like a lot of our friends did. 
    - We were in the position where we had savings and so could actually put down a good deposit on a house. that itself was the result of years of financial discipline.
    - We budgeted, and we stuck to our budget.
    - We were disciplined enough to make the monthly overpayments, each month, every month. 
     
    We have been lucky that it has worked as well as it had, but there is also a saying that luck is when preparation meets opportunity. Now I see opportunities in other areas (PMs, commodities).. I can't know for sure that they won't go lower, but I deem the risk/reward to be highly favourable over a medium-long time frame if you employ disciplined accumulation strategy. 
    Now we are faced with a doubled edged sword if we want to move.. we will be competing to buy in what I know in my heart is a very overpriced market (even despite the recent softening). But at least having your current home paid affords us the luxury of not having to be involved in a chain, and/or biding our time until we feel there is a good deal on the table.
     
  19. Like
    vand got a reaction from Goldhooked in Paying off the mortgage, one brick at a time   
    Yes, the strategy has worked well, but only because:
    - We took decisive action when the market was still in the doldrums in 2011 and we thought the risk/reward of buying was very favourable. However it would have been easy to have carry on the "one more year of renting" like a lot of our friends did. 
    - We were in the position where we had savings and so could actually put down a good deposit on a house. that itself was the result of years of financial discipline.
    - We budgeted, and we stuck to our budget.
    - We were disciplined enough to make the monthly overpayments, each month, every month. 
     
    We have been lucky that it has worked as well as it had, but there is also a saying that luck is when preparation meets opportunity. Now I see opportunities in other areas (PMs, commodities).. I can't know for sure that they won't go lower, but I deem the risk/reward to be highly favourable over a medium-long time frame if you employ disciplined accumulation strategy. 
    Now we are faced with a doubled edged sword if we want to move.. we will be competing to buy in what I know in my heart is a very overpriced market (even despite the recent softening). But at least having your current home paid affords us the luxury of not having to be involved in a chain, and/or biding our time until we feel there is a good deal on the table.
     
  20. Like
    vand got a reaction from KDave in Paying off the mortgage, one brick at a time   
    +1yr update:
    Long term plan is still progressing very well.  We have overpaid as much as is possible without incurring overpayment penalties, and have reduced the principle now to a very manageable amount. We have reduced our interest payments from £207/month down to just £167/month. 
    We are now 2 months away from the end our discount period, but I'm not even sure that it's worth remortgaging, as I expect to have everything paid off within a year now (work is currently paying very well!).  
    We have a 5 month old baby now so we will want to move somewhere larger sooner rather than later, and the idea of having our current home all paid off is immense. We will keep this home no matter what we do going forward, and start afresh with a new mortgage if and when we do move to a bigger place. 
     
  21. Haha
    vand got a reaction from PansPurse in Most consumer safes are garbage and can be opened in seconds   
    https://youtu.be/JMKQVPV1pf0?t=1m21s
  22. Like
    vand got a reaction from Goldhooked in Paying off the mortgage, one brick at a time   
    Yes, the strategy has worked well, but only because:
    - We took decisive action when the market was still in the doldrums in 2011 and we thought the risk/reward of buying was very favourable. However it would have been easy to have carry on the "one more year of renting" like a lot of our friends did. 
    - We were in the position where we had savings and so could actually put down a good deposit on a house. that itself was the result of years of financial discipline.
    - We budgeted, and we stuck to our budget.
    - We were disciplined enough to make the monthly overpayments, each month, every month. 
     
    We have been lucky that it has worked as well as it had, but there is also a saying that luck is when preparation meets opportunity. Now I see opportunities in other areas (PMs, commodities).. I can't know for sure that they won't go lower, but I deem the risk/reward to be highly favourable over a medium-long time frame if you employ disciplined accumulation strategy. 
    Now we are faced with a doubled edged sword if we want to move.. we will be competing to buy in what I know in my heart is a very overpriced market (even despite the recent softening). But at least having your current home paid affords us the luxury of not having to be involved in a chain, and/or biding our time until we feel there is a good deal on the table.
     
  23. Like
    vand got a reaction from KDave in Paying off the mortgage, one brick at a time   
    +1yr update:
    Long term plan is still progressing very well.  We have overpaid as much as is possible without incurring overpayment penalties, and have reduced the principle now to a very manageable amount. We have reduced our interest payments from £207/month down to just £167/month. 
    We are now 2 months away from the end our discount period, but I'm not even sure that it's worth remortgaging, as I expect to have everything paid off within a year now (work is currently paying very well!).  
    We have a 5 month old baby now so we will want to move somewhere larger sooner rather than later, and the idea of having our current home all paid off is immense. We will keep this home no matter what we do going forward, and start afresh with a new mortgage if and when we do move to a bigger place. 
     
  24. Like
    vand got a reaction from KDave in Paying off the mortgage, one brick at a time   
    +1yr update:
    Long term plan is still progressing very well.  We have overpaid as much as is possible without incurring overpayment penalties, and have reduced the principle now to a very manageable amount. We have reduced our interest payments from £207/month down to just £167/month. 
    We are now 2 months away from the end our discount period, but I'm not even sure that it's worth remortgaging, as I expect to have everything paid off within a year now (work is currently paying very well!).  
    We have a 5 month old baby now so we will want to move somewhere larger sooner rather than later, and the idea of having our current home all paid off is immense. We will keep this home no matter what we do going forward, and start afresh with a new mortgage if and when we do move to a bigger place. 
     
  25. Like
    vand reacted to Goldhooked in Paying off the mortgage, one brick at a time   
    ^This!  I know a lot of people would say invest rather than pay off a mortgage with the current low interest rates but the positive psychological effect of having no mortgage to pay is very appealing to me also.  We only have roughly a 10% mortgage left now and are overpaying so are nearly there.
    Well done on your strategy, it sounds like it’s working well.