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FrozenMojito

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  1. The original article is behind the Times' paywall (https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/little-can-be-achieved-by-simply-staring-at-the-sun-cg6tt5kqlqm). Part of it is reproduced here https://www.netweather.tv/forum/topic/2671-weather-eye/page/38/ ("Little can be achieved by simply staring at the sun"). It's not much more than standard journalistic guff about someone who got something wrong. the Met Office get worse flak on a daily basis. Corbyn trying to shut it down is the mark of a sore loser- the same reaction as when the British Chiropractic Association tried to sue a scientist who called them out for their daft beliefs. As the saying goes, the way to win an argument is with a better argument, not the suppression of ideas. Weather forecasting is a big deal for shipping companies, agriculture etc. If his methods of forecasting were as successful as he claims, by now he would either be the most successful weather forecaster in the world (or would possibly have had a horse's head in his bed from the Met Office). In reality it seems his methods are no more accurate than my mum's wonky knee hurting when it is going to rain. A scientist maybe but not a climate scientist. Brian May has a PhD in astrophysics but I wouldn't necessarily trust him if he made some loopy prediction based on staring at the sun either.
  2. Piers Corbyn- who has no qualifications in climate science- threw a hissy fit when a journo wrote an article that was critical of his work and he forbade further publication of his work without his approval. That is not the action of a "real scientist". I wouldn't trust him with anything related to climate change any more than I'd trust his brother with a country's economy.
  3. I've got one of those- see below. I don't really collect 50ps but I do have a few gaps in my £2 album I'm happy to swap it for: 2002 Commonwealth Games- Wales 2011 King James Bible 2011 Mary Rose 2012 Olympic handover
  4. I've seen dealers selling these at London Coin Fair. There are some dealers that specialise in ancient coins e.g. Silbury Coins http://www.silburycoins.co.uk I've thought about buying a few Roman or Greek coins to mix in with my own collection of modern coins to confuse archaeologists of the future when they find my buried hoard 😃 I would especially love to have a Greek tetradrachm featuring the Athenian owl. Maybe when I've got a spare few hundred quid...
  5. With that much silverware I'd probably be calling some of the places in the London Silver Vaults https://silvervaultslondon.com and seeing if they'd give me a reasonable price
  6. In case anyone might still be interested, I received some of Ollie's fantastic bricks today and made a post about it in the "Today I received" thread, together with some pictures...
  7. Today I received some silver building blocks from forum member @OlliesSilverBars. Recently I posted that I had bought some blocks made by Monarch, but was a bit disappointed that they don't interconnect with real Lego bricks. In another thread someone mentioned that Ollie's bricks do, so I bought some to test that out for myself. As the pictures below show, the bricks arrived nicely packed in little black bags, and are the same size as standard 2x4 Lego bricks. They even have the tubes underneath that give Lego bricks their "clutch power" but on the silver bricks they aren't full size. But they do indeed stack with real Lego bricks so it's possible to make a structure mixing up the silver and actual Lego. Being hollow, the bricks are lighter than the solid 1oz Monarch blocks. Of course, the presence of such treasure inevitably draws attention from the criminal fraternity, although small-time criminals are likely to make blunders when in pursuit of their nefarious activities that are likely to bring them to the attention of the law. Better hope the king is feeling merciful...
  8. I'd go for Turing too, but he's favourite to be on the next £50. I'll go for my local Hampshire hero, Gilbert White. He's basically the founding father of naturalism and his book, The Natural History of Selborne, has been in print since it was first published in 1789. It would also be a good complement to the Jane Austen banknote since Selborne is a short pony-and-trap ride from Jane's house at Chawton. Sheldrake was a scientist once, but certainly isn't any more.
  9. I agree with this statement. When I became a freelancer I rather vainly thought "I'm a smart chap, how hard can it be". A couple of quarters and painfully compiled VAT returns later I realised that I am an idiot and accounting is something best left to professionals. I got a recommendation and in the first meeting with the accountant I discovered that the returns I had made so far bore little semblance to reality, and they gave me information that basically saved me more money than their annual fee. Now they handle my business accounts and also the personal accounts of both my wife and me. Also I get to tell people that I have an accountant, which sounds very grown up.
  10. Someone's had those stamps tucked away for a while- that electricity one is from 1978...
  11. Today in a charity shop I found some 50% silver coins so I bought a few. Two florins (two shilling coin) and two shillings. I bought the book from the same shop. It's an anthology of Rudyard Kipling's poems. Three of the coins are from within Kipling's lifetime (1921- the fourth coin is from 1944- Kipling lived from 1865-1936). I wonder if he had coins like them jingling in his pocket when wrote the poem "Cold Iron": GOLD is for the mistress - silver for the maid" - Copper for the craftsman cunning at his trade! " " Good! " said the Baron, sitting in his hall, But Iron - Cold Iron - is master of them all."
  12. I've been getting them from Bleyer Bullion https://www.bleyerbullion.co.uk/queens-beasts-capsules Although they do seem pricey now I compare them to the others mentioned here
  13. I have several books about gold but not much about silver. But you could try... For a quick nicely illustrated overview of silver through history: Silver by Philippa Merriman Coins through history (most of which have been silver at some point or other): Symbols of Power edited by Thomas Hockenhull Buried treasure: Hoards by Eleanor Ghey All published by the British Museum Apart from some general stuff about asset allocation and so on, the books that I have seen that relate to investing in silver (and actually precious metals generally) are all written by paranoid doomsday cult type people and are rubbish.
  14. I bought some of the Monarch ones quite recently- see I'm still a little disappointed that they don't interlock with real Lego bricks... Interestingly there are "real" Lego bricks made of precious metals, which were awarded to employees of the Lego company for 25 years' service... one was sold a couple of years ago for £12,000- see https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/lego-brick-made-14-carat-9737987 (then there were the gold minifigures called "Mr Gold" that were randomly distributed a couple of years ago.. but this is getting off topic now 😃)
  15. I bought them on a trip to Malaysia from a company called BuySilverMalaysia. You can also see them on their website buysilvermalaysia.com.