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TeaTime

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  1. Never understood the appeal of 'em - boring and lazy design to me. I'll give you spot price for the tube 😎
  2. A friend of mine cleans all his silver bullion upon receipt with mild detergent, gently rubs with his fingers and pats dry the coin with paper towel. He has never had milk spotting on his coins and without a loupe you'd never know they'd been cleaned. I have cleaned toned coins with a quick dip in Goddards silver dip which will bring back the shine in about 3-4 seconds. Never tried to clean off greasy fingerprints though and i would imagine that if they've been there a while they will have marked the finish permanently.
  3. It's a far off nebula (at least that's what i'd say if i were the US Mint)...
  4. Took advantage of the sale to buy the lion of england set of silver pins at half price. £40 each is probably what they're worth. The cufflinks are really rather nice.
  5. Sorry, only bought one of each. The mintage figures for all of these rounds are tiny so it may take a while to find the others but they always pop up eventually.
  6. Nice set. The first three have been released and the last is due for release early January. I have an order placed direct with Golden State Mint for the last one. Postage is high so it's worth adding a few other rounds to an order, they also do them in copper. For some reason 'justice' seems to be available easily but the other two are hard to find in the UK. 1believerinchrist on Ebay has the prudence round for around £27 all-in, i've used this seller before and had no problems - the package arrived quickly with no duty (package marked as low value item).
  7. The crown has been cleaned to a lovely brilliant shine. Ideal for showing people but no numismatic value left in it. An uncleaned one in that condition(GF) would be worth around £30-£45.... Still, a nice show piece.
  8. TeaTime

    """£1 Value Help"""

    I have most of these, many purchased at auction. Realistically the individual coins will sell at numismatic auctions for £10-£15 each depending on demand. The 2017 for around £20-£25. I couldn't tell from the photos but you should have the four reverse proof coins which can sell as a set for £60-£80. Ebay prices are pot-luck. Having them all together in a nice display could add anything from £40-£60. You're then looking at anything from £420-£610 for the set, it wouldn't surprise me though if a collector was willing to pay £700. As scrap it would be 11oz of .925 which is around £115 !
  9. Due to the fact that mintage figures are not released until after the event, it's very difficult to predict which coins could potentially prove profitable. Almost guaranteed to increase in value are any coins that are minted to order. Once in a while RM will advertise coins and will only mint the amount that are actually pre-ordered by the public. The 'Blue Peter' Olympic 50p was one of them, at the time they were the sold for £2.50 (i sold one recently for £120). Over the last couple of years the only coins i'm aware of that were minted to order for a very limited time were the 2018 & 2019 Queens Beasts Lion of England cupro-nickle £5. Issued at £13 and i have seen for sale at £35+ (not bad for a coin less than a week old).
  10. As long as a coin is scratch free i really don't care about MINOR spotting or toning. Is a slabbed MS70 coin still a 70 if spotting developments ? Genuine question as i have no experience with slabbed coins - to me encapsulating a coin in plastic seems a waste of money. I ordered a couple of The Lion of England coins from RM and they arrived with a flaw - the 'G' of England has a divot inside it on both coins - i can only assume that a flake of silver must 've stuck to the die. I kept them because i liked the thought of owning RM errors.
  11. I buy what i like for the purpose of collecting but if i really like a coin i'll buy several. I'll then sell the extras at a later date - could be a year, could be a decade later. In this way i have a nice collection the cost of which has been reduced or off-set by any profits i make on my extras. It doesn't always work out that i make a profit from my 'extras' but i've been doing this for a while now and can usually spot a coin that will appreciate in value. I cant recall ever selling silver at a loss..Thers's no secret to that other than being prepared to hold silver for as long as needed. Most people have similar tastes in what makes a coin desirable. I guess that makes me a collector/flipper rather than a stacker.
  12. Yes, it matters to me on anything that's not a coin or certified silver bar. And i mean a proper hallmark not a '925' stamp that joe bloggs can buy off Ebay for £2. I am suspicious of any silver sold without a hallmark. And when i say suspicious i mean i have lost money in the past due to fraud. As far as i am concerned no-one should be able to sell silver items without a hallmark. 'Bullion' home-made bars etc included.
  13. TeaTime

    Proof or BU?

    Royal Mint silver proofs have historically gone down in price for the majority of coins. You can pick up silver proof sets for not a lot over spot, even the early very low mintage Britannia 4 coin silver proof sets can be had for around £100. Taking account of inflation they work out as a loss on the original selling price..... Proof coins are somewhat insulated from the spot price but i think the market for them is relatively small. Seeing as demand is the biggest factor in determining a things value then there is not a lot of scope for profits. Sometimes though things become more desirable for unfathomable reasons. I treat bullion coins and proof coins as completely different animals. Bullion is for salting away a few pennies when i can and proofs are for me to enjoy.
  14. I used to go to a local numismatic auction around about that time and i can tell you that i never paid more than £5 for a Britannia. I used to walk out of the auction with a cardboard box full of 'modern' silver coins - no-one wanted them ! My colleague used to laugh at me buying pretty much everything that came up. When i sold the lot in 2011 it was my turn to laugh.