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Bumble

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About Bumble

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  1. I'm wishing I'd taken my own advice and bought the house-builders. The market seems to think that Boris' win is good for them:
  2. Well just be glad you weren't invested in Eddie Stobart...
  3. Surely the financials will be worst affected if there is another financial crash. If you are just expecting a recession then OK, but then house-builders shouldn't be too badly affected. Having said that, I'm out of house-builders at the moment. Commercial REITS like BLND would also fall in a recession. I like GSK because pharma and healthcare is defensive. I also like RIO, though obviously a recession would reduce demand for industrial metals.
  4. For myself, I'm prejudiced against financials, so I wouldn't own HSBC, BARC, or AV. Any reason not to include GSK? Also, the house-builders pay fairly well: GFRD, TW, BDEV.
  5. I don't think the nature of the breaches was published. I am not a customer of Glint myself, so I 'm not in a position to recommend or not recommend them. If you are concerned about them, there are plenty of alternative ways of owning gold these days.
  6. Apparently the story was that earlier this year a private wealth management company in Singapore made a take-over offer to the Glint management. This was declined, so the company bought up the £5 million debt that Glint had used to capitalize itself when starting up. They went through the terms and conditions of the debt agreement and found some provisions where Glint was in breach and forced Glint into administration. Glint was always solvent, and the customer funds were secure. Glint has now raised fresh capital to replace this debt, and it is now out of adminstration. So all the fuss was down to a bit of corporate strong-arm tactics.
  7. Something to remember with tobacco stocks is that many of them are betting their future on vaping products. There is a growing movement that wants vaping banned because of health and safety concerns. It may be an overblown reaction to a few deaths, but it may gain momentum.
  8. I haven't kept receipts from 10 years ago, but my strong impression is that my grocery bills are now nearly twice as high as they were 10 years ago. A double in 10 years would mean a compound increase of about 7% per year. The overall CPI rate is low because of the way the basket of goods is constructed. For example, this table (from the UK government website) shows that restaurants and hotels have a higher weighting than food and beverages, but many people make little use of restaurants and hotels, so they are not benefitting from the lower rise in prices.
  9. Lithium is not rare, though there have been some supply bottlenecks in recent years that resulted in the price rising temporarily. The main impact of battery metal demand is on nickel and cobalt. Battery companies are trying to develop battery chemistries that use less cobalt, because most of the world's supply comes from the Democractic Republic of Congo. A lot more copper will also be needed for BEVs, and some of the rare earth metals. It is a tough call to invest in battery metals, because if the world slips into recession, demand for industrial metals will fall. Nevertheless, I think battery vehicles are a better proposition than fuel cells. Generating hydrogen from natural gas puts CO2 in the atmosphere. Generating it by electrolysis of water is expensive and inefficient. Generating hydrogen, storing it, transporting it, and then consuming it in a fuel cell is thermodynamically inefficient. There is no infrastructure for transporting hydrogen, whereas there is an existing infrastructure for the transmission of electricity. The Japanese may be able to make it work in Japan, but I don't see it becoming that big elsewhere.