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NewMSmatist15

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    United States
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What I am collecting / Investing in.

  • What I am collecting / Investing in.
    Currently collecting the silver Britannia series, silver proof Queen's Beasts, and dabbling in some Commonwealth Country coinage when I see something I like.

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  1. NewMSmatist15

    2008 Silver Britannia

    @Bullionaire the 2003 is one of my favorite designs! I have one in MS 68 I "cross-graded" from an old ANACS holder. Hard to see in photos, but from this angle your 2003 looks nice. That 2007 looks much better than the one I had. At the very least you have some nice bullion semi-numismatics. With regards to your comment about the look of slabbed coins I tend to agree. Some coins I think look really nice in an NGC holder, but I get the dislike. My argument would be it is almost the same as putting a coin in a capsule and there is little doubt and disagreement over the authenticity or quality when in an NGC or PCGS holder. I like knowing I have one of the finest known 2001 Britannias and that it is protected. Just preference.
  2. NewMSmatist15

    2008 Silver Britannia

    @Bullionaire I bought a similar coin off eBay (a 2007) also in this same hard cardboard packaging. It was roughly $81 USD with shipping. I decided to get it graded since I have a registry set and am a collector of Britannia coins. My 2007 looked good in the packet and had some tarnish on the side, but no visible marks to me without taking it outside the plastic holder. Grading cost me another $31 USD roughly and it came back an MS 67 DPL. I definitely did not add value to this coin grading it and while I didn't sell it, I don't think I'd make money off this coin either. I doubt I'd break even unless I wait some time. I would recommend if you got a good deal on it and like it, keep it. If you think it might grade 68 or higher you could def sell it for a profit, otherwise it may break even or cost you money. Less than MS 67 you still have a better chance than me of breaking even, but why risk it? If you don't like it and would rather a better example, I bet you could sell it as is and make some money as well. I strongly suggest not cleaning this coin as these coins have numismatic value even though they were sold originally as bullion. The design changed almost annually (depends on the year) and the mintages were limited enough that it makes available, but collectible. Leave it as is, sell it, or grade it. But DO NOT clean it.
  3. NewMSmatist15

    2008 Silver Britannia

    NGC states on there site it uses 5x magnification, PCGS states "High Magnification" and "no detectable imperfections" for a 70
  4. NewMSmatist15

    Frank Frazetta silver barbarian

    https://www.apmex.com/product/103692/1-oz-silver-proof-round-frank-frazetta-the-barbarian It's a silver round not a coin, but it's on APMEX
  5. There's a "new to the silver forum" thread where you can introduce yourself as a new member.
  6. NewMSmatist15

    ICG grading success or failure?

    Another coin I sent off in the same batch as my other Britannia coins was this 1998. 1998 is the first year of issue for the Britannia silver coins in the business strike or "mint state" version, a year after the introduction of the proof version in 1997. This is not one of the rarer dates in terms of mintages, but it is desirable as a first year of issue in a series. I bought it on eBay for a decent price, but had no idea what the results would be for a cross grade. As with the other coins in the submission, this coin was sent in for the modern tier NCS/NGC conservation and grading combination. This costs $28 as of this submission, but with the shipping cost, insurance, submission fee, this coin cost a little over $30 to grade. This is not a true "crossover" as it is not a PCGS slab, but NGC will remove a coin from an ICG slab if the waiver is signed with the submission. This coin, as you can see from the photos, came back an MS 68 in an NGC holder. the 1998 does have a population of 3 in MS 70 on the NGC census and a fair few in MS 69. I believe the MS 68 is a result of a stain near the queen's effigy in the field near the back of her head. It looks like a drop of water hit the coin, evaporated, and left a ring like you would see on a coffee table. It is very small and not that noticeable, but it could of course knock a coin down a grade. One thing to note about this, the ICG slab designated this coin as DCAM for deep cameo. This is not one of the coins that is recognized as having cameo with NGC because the fields are matte and the design is reflective. I've noticed on modern reverse proofs they also don't get a cameo designation. As with the other coins the original label was sent back to be in the flip used during the grading process, but unlike the other ones this flip had two NGC stickers on it. It isn't easy to see, but beneath the second sticker there is a SMS on the original label that NGC used. SMS is an acronym for Special Mint Strike that is usually given to US coins that aren't proof coins, aren't business strike coins, but have a nice matte finish on them like this coin. Again, this doesn't add any value to the coin, but it was interesting to see the process that NGC first assigned the wrong designation - probably because of the ICG label showing the DCAM designation - and then at some point a grader or conservationist corrected it. Well SIlver Forum, what do you think about this coin, is it a grading success or failure?
  7. NewMSmatist15

    Do you think the Two Dragons Silver Coin will do well?

    Love the concept, similar idea as the Chinese Panda and Berlin Bear that I've seen on a coin for a money fair in Germany. I think it is a bit expensive as a one-off coin. It is also a decent design, but not amazing.
  8. NewMSmatist15

    Question : Great Britain 1/4 oz Silver Britannia SS Gairsoppa

    2013 was a difficult year for Britannia coins all around I think. Many have milk spotting. I'm pretty sure that was the transitional year from Britannia silver to .999 fine. And, yes, there was a special striking of shipwreck silver in 1/4 ounce coins for 2013 and 2014, but no other year or sizes.
  9. NewMSmatist15

    CGS to NGC crossover - bad idea :(

    Hard to tell about luster from those photos, but does look like there are some marks on the rim on the reverse (5 o'clock). What are the fields like? Marks and scratches?
  10. NewMSmatist15

    CGS to NGC crossover - bad idea :(

    I've avoided buying these CGS coins for the very reason I know the LEAST about them as a grading company. I think it is a London based grading firm, but the fact they use a 100 point scale instead of a Sheldon scale makes it difficult to determine which grades are equivalent. I believe CGS claims a 96 or up coin is a 70, which means 5 different CGS grades equate to a "perfect" coin in NGC or PCGS! That seems pretty absurd on the face of it. I've crossed ICG, ANACS, and PCGS coins to NGC, but never CGS. If you post photos I'd be curious to see the difference. Also, was it a UK coin or a non-UK coin?
  11. NewMSmatist15

    Which digital scales should I buy?

    I use an AWS 100 gram scale that goes to two decimal points. It is a small size, batteries last a long time, and it is simple to use. Most coins are not going to weigh more than 100 grams, but if you plan on stacking large bars you would quickly outgrow this scale. I use it for everything from weighing silver coins to US pennies to check if they're bronze.
  12. NewMSmatist15

    2010 Britannia in ANACS holders - now NGC

    Continuing with my submission to NGC, I submitted two 2010 Britannia Silver 1 ounce coins that were holdered in ANACS MS 70 slabs. These coins were submitted as modern conservation, a tier that combines the conservation and grading costs to $28 total, and NGC will remove the coin from the holder, but will not honor them as a cross-grade like PCGS holders. I've received them back in the NGC holders, and have photos posted below. I was pleasantly surprised that one came back an MS 70 in the NGC holder as popular opinion is that these come back a grade lower. Even the MS 69 is a victory to me considering the price I paid for that coin. Total, the MS 69 cost me a little over $67 which includes the grading fees. I highly doubt I could get an NGC graded MS 69 2010 on an auction website or from another collector for that price. I'm hesitant to think there is an advantage in buying ANACS coins and then submitting them for NGC grades, since I have other examples I will post that didn't turn out as well. However, a good deal on a coin is a good deal regardless of the holder it seems. Side note! I really like how NGC sends back the original ANACS label in a flip as well. It is not worth anything necessarily, and I doubt it matters to most people, but I really enjoy seeing the "history" of that specific coin from probably a raw coin to an ANACS holder and on to an NGC one now in my possession. Silver Forum members let me know what you think!
  13. NewMSmatist15

    Sent off some coins to NGC (Part 2)

    I've sent in 2 submissions now, only an annual event for me, and it really isn't worth it unless you have at least 10 coins on one form. Put another way at least 10 of a type (modern silver, economy gold, etc.). That being said, my first submission was probably a bit of a waste since I was adding coins thinking "I'm sending in a submission anyways" and those coins I was unsure of add cost quickly. The benefit is, I've submitted some coins that are hard to find in graded examples. I guess it depends on how much money you want to spend per year on a service that doesn't add coins to your collection but potentially enhances them.
  14. NewMSmatist15

    Sent off some coins to NGC (Part 2)

    I've heard these referred to as "basement holders". I bought a 1 ounce Britannia in one and it wasn't as nice as I was hoping it to be. I also hate how you can't see the edge in these! So all in, and I submitted about 13 coins, it cost me roughly $32 a coin with shipping, the fees, insurance, etc.
  15. NewMSmatist15

    Sent off some coins to NGC (Part 2)

    Was it raw or in a holder? If a holder, what company and grade?