• The above Banner is a Sponsored Banner.

    Upgrade to Premium Membership to remove this Banner & All Google Ads. For full list of Premium Member benefits Click HERE.

  • Join The Silver Forum

    The Silver Forum is one of the largest and best loved silver and gold precious metals forums in the world. Join today for FREE! Browse the sponsors topics (hidden to guests) for deals and offers, check out the bargains in the members trade section and join in with our community reacting and commenting on topic posts. If you have any questions whatsoever about precious metals collecting and investing please join and start a topic and we will be here to help with our knowledge :) happy stacking. 

Silverstackeruk

Milk spot on my Britannia

Recommended Posts

The spotting issue is why I will never buy or collect graded silver coins ever again. I’ve had amazing coins - graded ms 70 and pf70 and there is nothing more heart breaking than to pull them out of storage to take a look at them - only to find a spot or two or three. Even still in the pcgs or ngc holder - doesn’t matter - the value of the coin has now become one of ms69 or pf69 or even lower.

Too much risk in my opinion to pay so much for something that may spot!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has it been determined definitively what the cause is?  As it seems to be more prone on some, from endemic to rare from different mints, it must be part common, part mint specific process.  As i recall there is no problem with older coins .925 silver, so is the simple solution to revert from .999 silver to something slight less pure but free from this affliction?  At least for proofs where the value is in the finish rather than the metal content.

Edited by Martlet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Martlet said:

Has it been determined definitively what the cause is?  As it seems to be more prone on some, from endemic to rare from different mints, it must be part common, part mint specific process.  As i recall there is no problem with older coins .925 silver, so is the simple solution to revert from .999 silver to something slight less pure but free from this affliction?  At least for proofs where the value is in the finish rather than the metal content.

The common theory is that the planchets are not rinsed sufficiently and that this residue is then baked in when planchets are heated prior to the minting (to relieve internal stress in the metal).

There are a few Peter Rabbits (925 silver) that have milked, so it will have to do with a change in the manufacturing process. My guess is still MoS grease, which might act as a catalyst to turn Ag to AgS, which then can easily change into all sorts of things including AgCl. 

Edited by augur

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now