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Clens92

Premium Member
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Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Clens92 got a reaction from JohnAnsink in I Joined the Sovereign Club   
    I saw someone pay £130 for a gold-plated 1887 sixpence only two weeks ago.  It happens all the time... it's not difficult to see the difference so my sympathy is somewhat limited.
    And yes, a very nice example that you've got yourself there.  Might hit Mint State.
  2. Thanks
    Clens92 got a reaction from JohnAnsink in 1919 - 1920 50% or Sterling & Gothic Unboxing   
    There is no 1920 coin that is .925 silver; that website is mistaken.
    Anything up to and including 1919 = .925 silver.
    Anything from 1920 and until 1946 (inclusive) is .500 silver.
  3. Like
    Clens92 got a reaction from airmac in My first sovereign   
    Looks like you've got a high-rimmed re-strike.  Very rare to find genuine 1925s, you've probably got a 1949 / 1950 / 1951 restrike.
    Price seems about right.
  4. Like
    Clens92 got a reaction from airmac in My first sovereign   
    Looks like you've got a high-rimmed re-strike.  Very rare to find genuine 1925s, you've probably got a 1949 / 1950 / 1951 restrike.
    Price seems about right.
  5. Like
    Clens92 got a reaction from airmac in My first sovereign   
    Looks like you've got a high-rimmed re-strike.  Very rare to find genuine 1925s, you've probably got a 1949 / 1950 / 1951 restrike.
    Price seems about right.
  6. Thanks
    Clens92 got a reaction from JohnAnsink in Old British Banknotes?   
    Have at it:  http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/banknotes/Pages/denom_guide/default.aspx
    The note in your original post is not a British banknote, per se, but a privately issued banknote that circulated within Britain at the time.  All UK-wide banknotes were issued by the Bank of England, at the time.
  7. Like
    Clens92 reacted to sovereignsteve in December DNW auction   
    yes proofs I can understand
    yes proofs I can understand

  8. Like
    Clens92 got a reaction from Jester in 1 oz gold 100 Francs Nautical Ounce Santa Maria   
    It might help if you put some proof of ownership in one of the photos - and indicated if you were willing to send the coin before payment. 
  9. Like
    Clens92 got a reaction from Jester in 1 oz gold 100 Francs Nautical Ounce Santa Maria   
    It might help if you put some proof of ownership in one of the photos - and indicated if you were willing to send the coin before payment. 
  10. Like
    Clens92 got a reaction from augur in War?   
    The reason Afghanistan didn't have a massive impact is because it was a failed state with no major exports, or imports.  It was, in essence, a country that did not matter.  Iraq was similar due to the impact of sanctions by the point of invasion, although Iraq did have a major impact on oil prices.
    A lot of the industries you mentioned are nationalised, or semi-private government run.  However, you'd have been very rich if you'd invested in Halliburton before the IRaq war, you would have seen in excess of a 100% return on your money.  Dick Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld destroyed Iraq, and then the same men used America tax-dollars to pay Halliburton to rebuild it... they just happened to be shareholders.
    Uncertainty is anything that could conceivably impact everyday market trading.  War causes uncertainty, which causes the price to move - some people will bet that one thing will happen, others will lay that bet.
  11. Haha
    Clens92 got a reaction from Roy in Catalonia and the effect on banks   
    This all reminds me of my favourite scene from Yes, Minister.  What is bad for the EU is generally good for Britain; it's not a popular opinion but as Spain weakens, Britain gets stronger and I'm all for it.  I have to say, after their actions in Gibraltar, I'd quite like Spain to have a difficult diplomatic crisis.
     
    Sir Humphrey: Minister, Britain has had the same foreign policy objective for at least the last 500 years: to create a disunited Europe. In that cause we have fought with the Dutch against the Spanish, with the Germans against the French, with the French and Italians against the Germans, and with the French against the Germans and Italians. Divide and rule, you see. Why should we change now, when it’s worked so well?

    Hacker: That’s all ancient history, surely?

    Sir Humphrey: Yes, and current policy. We had to break the whole thing [the EEC] up, so we had to get inside. We tried to break it up from the outside, but that wouldn’t work. Now that we’re inside we can make a complete pig’s breakfast of the whole thing: set the Germans against the French, the French against the Italians, the Italians against the Dutch… The Foreign Office is terribly pleased; it’s just like old times.

    Hacker: But surely we’re all committed to the European ideal?

    Sir Humphrey: [chuckles] Really, minister.

    Hacker: If not, why are we pushing for an increase in the membership?

    Sir Humphrey: Well, for the same reason. It’s just like the United Nations, in fact; the more members it has, the more arguments it can stir up, the more futile and impotent it becomes.
    Hacker: What appalling cynicism.

    Sir Humphrey: Yes… We call it diplomacy, minister.
  12. Haha
    Clens92 got a reaction from Roy in Catalonia and the effect on banks   
    This all reminds me of my favourite scene from Yes, Minister.  What is bad for the EU is generally good for Britain; it's not a popular opinion but as Spain weakens, Britain gets stronger and I'm all for it.  I have to say, after their actions in Gibraltar, I'd quite like Spain to have a difficult diplomatic crisis.
     
    Sir Humphrey: Minister, Britain has had the same foreign policy objective for at least the last 500 years: to create a disunited Europe. In that cause we have fought with the Dutch against the Spanish, with the Germans against the French, with the French and Italians against the Germans, and with the French against the Germans and Italians. Divide and rule, you see. Why should we change now, when it’s worked so well?

    Hacker: That’s all ancient history, surely?

    Sir Humphrey: Yes, and current policy. We had to break the whole thing [the EEC] up, so we had to get inside. We tried to break it up from the outside, but that wouldn’t work. Now that we’re inside we can make a complete pig’s breakfast of the whole thing: set the Germans against the French, the French against the Italians, the Italians against the Dutch… The Foreign Office is terribly pleased; it’s just like old times.

    Hacker: But surely we’re all committed to the European ideal?

    Sir Humphrey: [chuckles] Really, minister.

    Hacker: If not, why are we pushing for an increase in the membership?

    Sir Humphrey: Well, for the same reason. It’s just like the United Nations, in fact; the more members it has, the more arguments it can stir up, the more futile and impotent it becomes.
    Hacker: What appalling cynicism.

    Sir Humphrey: Yes… We call it diplomacy, minister.
  13. Haha
    Clens92 got a reaction from Roy in Catalonia and the effect on banks   
    This all reminds me of my favourite scene from Yes, Minister.  What is bad for the EU is generally good for Britain; it's not a popular opinion but as Spain weakens, Britain gets stronger and I'm all for it.  I have to say, after their actions in Gibraltar, I'd quite like Spain to have a difficult diplomatic crisis.
     
    Sir Humphrey: Minister, Britain has had the same foreign policy objective for at least the last 500 years: to create a disunited Europe. In that cause we have fought with the Dutch against the Spanish, with the Germans against the French, with the French and Italians against the Germans, and with the French against the Germans and Italians. Divide and rule, you see. Why should we change now, when it’s worked so well?

    Hacker: That’s all ancient history, surely?

    Sir Humphrey: Yes, and current policy. We had to break the whole thing [the EEC] up, so we had to get inside. We tried to break it up from the outside, but that wouldn’t work. Now that we’re inside we can make a complete pig’s breakfast of the whole thing: set the Germans against the French, the French against the Italians, the Italians against the Dutch… The Foreign Office is terribly pleased; it’s just like old times.

    Hacker: But surely we’re all committed to the European ideal?

    Sir Humphrey: [chuckles] Really, minister.

    Hacker: If not, why are we pushing for an increase in the membership?

    Sir Humphrey: Well, for the same reason. It’s just like the United Nations, in fact; the more members it has, the more arguments it can stir up, the more futile and impotent it becomes.
    Hacker: What appalling cynicism.

    Sir Humphrey: Yes… We call it diplomacy, minister.
  14. Thanks
    Clens92 got a reaction from Cornishfarmer in NGC Grading Submissions Open   
     
    Have you checked this site for US coins?  It's a wonderful resource; the pro-tip is to always be more critical than you think.
    https://www.pcgs.com/photograde/#/10Ind/Grades
    I think yours looks around an AU55, but the photos would need to be clearer to make a confident call on that one.
  15. Thanks
    Clens92 got a reaction from JohnAnsink in 1887 Sixpence -- Proof?   
    Did you buy it as a proof?  1887 coins are very strong strikes, and often do have proof-like qualities - albeit I suspect that this is a circulation strike.
  16. Like
    Clens92 got a reaction from KDave in Catalonia and the effect on banks   
    Sorry, where is the evidence for this?  Unionists are still, just, in the majority.  Similarly, Catholics make up only 45% of the population...
    However, if it got to a stage where anti-UK parties wanted to break away from the Union, then a referendum would be needed (and granted).  It would take longer to organise purely due to past political issues, but nothing would actually prevent a border poll.
  17. Like
    Clens92 got a reaction from KDave in Catalonia and the effect on banks   
    Not sure this is a brilliant comparison.  Most people on here did very well due to the referendum as we're pretty heavily invested in metals.
    Yes, you could apply that logic all over Europe.  But of all the European states, Spain has the most recent and uncomfortable relationship with fascism that has never been properly addressed.  It's a poor excuse for a democracy, and shows all the nervousness of an unstable democracy.  Other EU states allow further devolution and quasi-independence (see Wallonia for example, with the Canadian Free Trade deal) but Spain goes the other way and writes a constitution designed to perpetually subjugate distinct groups.
    The City of London has around 8000 residents... the vast majority of workers live elsewhere.  However, if the City of London's residents has a distinct and historically unique ethnic identity, then there would be nothing stopping them raising the question of indepedence... as permitted by UK Law.
  18. Like
    Clens92 got a reaction from Stu in Catalonia and the effect on banks   
    Regardless of the turnout (which did appear massive, but electoral standards were clearly very lax), the way Spain handled the crisis has effectively put in motion an unstoppable march towards independence for Catalonia now.  A democratic government cannot fear a vote, illegal or legal... using the paramilitary police to baton charge old grannies was a stupid, dangerous move.
  19. Like
    Clens92 got a reaction from Stu in Catalonia and the effect on banks   
    Regardless of the turnout (which did appear massive, but electoral standards were clearly very lax), the way Spain handled the crisis has effectively put in motion an unstoppable march towards independence for Catalonia now.  A democratic government cannot fear a vote, illegal or legal... using the paramilitary police to baton charge old grannies was a stupid, dangerous move.
  20. Like
    Clens92 got a reaction from Jester in Silver Full Crowns   
    Did you post them here before sending them off?  I think the forum could have advised which ones to send for grading, and which might be a risk.
    The 1818 doesn't look bad at all, I like it and would be interested if you find a price.  But some of the Vickies are clearly cleaned / rubbed so probably shouldn't have gone to grading. 
    Have you purchased a coin grading book?  They cost about £12 and mine paid for itself 20 times over within a week of having it.
  21. Like
    Clens92 got a reaction from Jester in Silver Full Crowns   
    Did you post them here before sending them off?  I think the forum could have advised which ones to send for grading, and which might be a risk.
    The 1818 doesn't look bad at all, I like it and would be interested if you find a price.  But some of the Vickies are clearly cleaned / rubbed so probably shouldn't have gone to grading. 
    Have you purchased a coin grading book?  They cost about £12 and mine paid for itself 20 times over within a week of having it.
  22. Like
    Clens92 got a reaction from Jester in Silver Full Crowns   
    Did you post them here before sending them off?  I think the forum could have advised which ones to send for grading, and which might be a risk.
    The 1818 doesn't look bad at all, I like it and would be interested if you find a price.  But some of the Vickies are clearly cleaned / rubbed so probably shouldn't have gone to grading. 
    Have you purchased a coin grading book?  They cost about £12 and mine paid for itself 20 times over within a week of having it.
  23. Like
    Clens92 got a reaction from Jester in Silver Full Crowns   
    Did you post them here before sending them off?  I think the forum could have advised which ones to send for grading, and which might be a risk.
    The 1818 doesn't look bad at all, I like it and would be interested if you find a price.  But some of the Vickies are clearly cleaned / rubbed so probably shouldn't have gone to grading. 
    Have you purchased a coin grading book?  They cost about £12 and mine paid for itself 20 times over within a week of having it.
  24. Like
    Clens92 got a reaction from Jester in 2017 Half Sovereign question   
    The coins won't come in capsules if they're bullion, unless the seller has added a capsule to the sale.
    The finish on modern bullion sovereigns is usually very good - strikes are crisp and clear, although some find the colour to look a little odd due to the different mix of alloys used in the minting process.
  25. Like
    Clens92 got a reaction from kimchi in Sir Isaac Newton: the rarest circulation 50p   
    I take back what I said... only 375 will be released.  Absolutely no chance of these going into tills - the shop staff will have them away before they get close to a cash till.
    What's the point in releasing such a negligible amount... £187.50 worth.  Rubbish.